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St. Charles Divorce Law Blog

Loss of child custody can be an emotional experience for parents

For many Missouri parents, it would be difficult to admit that another parent or family member is better equipped to raise his or her children. While certainly, the best interests of a child must come first, a parent who finds him- or herself on the losing end of a child custody dispute can face emotional pain. One mother has recently opened up about what it feels like to lose child custody.

The woman has three biological children. Before having her third child, she came to the painful decision that the father of her two boys was more capable of caring for them than she was herself. She reasoned that he had a stable job and a large extended family, and that the boys would be well taken care of. She later regretted having missed so many milestones as her sons grew up. 

The challenges of a high asset divorce from a narcissist

18221832_S.jpgIt can be challenging enough to break away from a marriage in which the other party is a narcissist. They tend to view themselves as the victim under these circumstances. This could make a high asset divorce from someone with this personality type even more of a challenge than being married to one.

Most narcissists, whether they live here in Missouri or elsewhere, refuse to be cooperative. They tend to ignore the other party's points of view and do not want to compromise. They tend to lash out whenever possible, especially in private.

A surrogacy agreement may be the way to go in 2018

101804065_S.jpgMany Missouri couples may find themselves struggling to find a way to have children of their own. In decades past, the alternatives may have seemed limited, but in today's world, there are many options. One of these options is called a surrogacy agreement.

In recent years, several celebrities have attempted to help change the stigma that was once attached to surrogacy. It used to be believed by many that women who offered their services to carry a child were doing so for the money in an attempt to relieve personal financial woes. Quite to the contrary, it has now been shown that one's financial status shouldn't always determine her ability or willingness to be an adequate surrogate.

Prenuptial agreement can be the first step to a lasting marriage

44969608_S.jpgMarriage is looked upon as the beginning of a wonderful journey that a couple will share for the rest of their lives in Missouri. The reality is that almost half of all marriages end in divorce. People enter into it promise to share worldly goods, support each other and care for each other in sickness and health. Divorce can change this perspective, particularly where worldly goods are concerned. Having a prenuptial agreement can simplify property division.

Having a prenuptial agreement may even reduce the chance of divorce. In addition to financial concerns, another cause for a marriage ending is a lack of communication. Establishing clear lines of communication needed to create a prenuptial agreement can help forge skills that can last a lifetime.

Immigration woes affect physical custody

34740572_S.jpgMissouri residents may be as confused as the rest of the nation as they attempt to keep up with the recent changes to immigration laws. Many people are aware that some immigrants have lost physical custody of their children as they attempt to clear up their immigration status. Many of these children are taken into government foster care, and the matter can be complicated to sort. 

When the immigration status of a parent is called into question, he or she may have the option to allow a family member to care for his or her children who are already in the country. Many families are afraid to take advantage of this offer because they fear that naming a family member to care for their children may call the family member's status into question as well. Many parents allow their children to be taken into foster care because they are under the impression it will help them remedy their legal woes quickly. 

Nonpayment of child support may face new penalties

32720597_S.jpgMissouri parents may already be aware that failing to make timely payments for a court ordered obligation can result in the imposition of legal penalties. Child support orders are enforceable by law, and falling behind on payments can result in myriad of troubles. One common repercussion in the state is that a parent who has failed to comply with a child support order for a period of three months may have his or her driver's license suspended. Recently, an unrelated situation has some hoping to change this sentence. 

Missouri now faces a problem shared by the nation as a whole. An industry-wide shortage of truck drivers has many desperate for a solution. The United States largely relies on big trucks as a way to quickly ship goods from place to place. The shortage of qualified drivers has lead many to request action, and Governor Parsons is among those trying to use quick thinking to remedy the crisis.

Child custody orders protect parents and children

52036829_S.jpgMany Missouri families may be familiar with situations in which parents who live in separate households must figure out how to share custody of a child. Many parents believe they can work out a schedule outside of the court system, and may reason that the parents, though separated, have a friendly relationship. Though this may be a tempting route to explore, not having an official child custody order in place leaves parents vulnerable to future problems. 

Recently, police were contacted when a Missouri father came to the mother's residence to pick the child up for a visit. A dispute between the parents required the presence of law enforcement to sort the matter. Upon arrival, police determined that, since there was no child custody order, the father was technically trespassing, and he was formally charged. 

High asset divorce becomes convoluted legal matter

18955977_S.jpgEnding a marriage can be a complicated matter. Turning one household into two separate ones can take time. In the case of a high asset divorce, there is potential for myriad of snags, especially if unrelated legal matters are unfolding concurrently. A former Missouri couple now stands accused of falsely filing for divorce. 

The male spouse was employed with a major food brand, and in the course of his time on the job, he was found guilty of defrauding his employer. The judge in that case ordered him to pay restitution in the amount of $3.9 million. He also served time in prison, then was released under supervised probation. 

Disabled parents fear child custody issues

22551026_S.jpgMissouri parents would likely agree that each parent-child relationship is different. In an age where parents are aware of the far-reaching extent of child abuse across the nation, many fear that the regular scrapes, bumps and bruises that children get from time to time may be mistaken by onlookers as a sign of physical abuse in the home. Recently, parents who suffer from conditions that have rendered them blind or deaf have spoken out, saying they feel they are often singled out in these situations, and they fear their handicap can lead to a change in child custody. 

Many Missouri parents say their fears are not unfounded, and they can provide recent examples in which a parent lost custody of his or her child based on an assumption that their disability prevents them from being a good parent. They argue that many of the methods used by courts and social workers to determine appropriate child custody are based on the relationships seeing and hearing parents have with their children. A blind parent who cannot see a bruise on his or her child may not be aware others suspect abuse. A deaf parent who cannot hear his or her child cry or call for help may be looked upon as incapable. 

Child custody laws can apply to daycare workers

28423236_S.jpgOne Missouri mother recently found herself living a nightmare when she arrived to pick her daughter up from daycare. Instead of discussing the day's events, and finding her child happy and ready to go home, she was horrified to find the daycare locked and empty. Fortunately, she found her daughter on a bench outside and learned afterward that action may be taken, because some child custody laws can apply to daycare providers. 

Though the daycare was apologetic for somehow forgetting the small child, the Missouri mother was angry. Leaving a helpless child unattended is dangerous and against the law. She feels fortunate that no physical harm came to her child, but the shocking circumstances have prompted her to consider legal action. 

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