${site.data.firmName}${SEMFirmNameAlt} Main Menu
Call Today: 855-805-0595

St. Charles Divorce Law Blog

Kim Kardashian West reveals her surrogacy agreement

48593406_S.jpgCelebrity couple Kim Kardashian and Kanye West have made headlines again. In addition to their accomplishments as reality television stars, music industry favorites and champions for a variety of social causes and charities, the couple is also raising four beautiful children. While fans in Missouri and around the world enjoy "keeping up with" the latest news on the couple, many may be surprised to learn that the latest addition to the Kardashian/West brood, a son named Psalm, was brought into the world via a surrogacy agreement

Once considered by many to be a taboo procedure that preyed upon the bodies of underprivileged women, surrogacy advocates like Kim Kardashian West are fighting to change this archaic image. Kim has used her own personal struggle with dangerous pregnancy issues such as preeclampsia to illustrate why a surrogate can be a blessing to a couple that dreams of welcoming a new baby. Sometimes, a couple wants a biological child, but a mother may be unable to carry or deliver the child without great risk of injury or death to herself and/or the unborn child. 

Could moving affect your child support payments?

43696673_S.jpgMissouri parents know that, when it comes to taking care of a child, finances can become a concern. Especially in the summer months, when most children are not in school, the cost of raising a child can be a major stress that falls upon a parent. Many parents may have a child support order, which helps ensure that both parents contribute to a child's financial needs. 

A parent may not be aware that moving to another state can affect child support payments. Each state has a different approach to calculating child support payments, and knowledgeable sources say that these payments can vary by at least $700 from state to state. If a parent is considering a move, he or she may want to seek legal advice to see how these payments could be affected. 

What factors into a child custody decision?

47801373_S.jpgBeing a parent is a rewarding but sometimes trying experience. Missouri families may be in the midst of circumstances that bring about a court action that will determine child custody. When a parent is preparing to appear in court for custody proceedings, he or she might be curious to know what factors play into the judge's final decision. 

Child custody proceedings often take some time, and this is because the court will try to examine each situation's individual circumstances. While each case is unique, there are some basic points that are usually taken into consideration. It is important for a parent fighting for custody to be aware of the questions he or she might be asked, and the highlights that can make or break his or her petition. 

New measures may be taken to support importance of paternity

100623406_S.jpgThe state of Missouri realizes that fathers are important. While other places in the country have taken measures to support fathers and matters regarding paternity, most companies in Missouri still do not offer paid paternal leave. This can place an unfair burden on new dads and deprive an infant of critical bonding time. Besides, Mom would probably love an extra set of hands around to help as she recovers from the birth. 

New research indicates that having Dad around can be beneficial. Lower rates of infant death, better results with breastfeeding, and even a decreased risk of postpartum depression for Mom are now attributed to allowing a man to take advantage of paid paternal leave. Now, there is a push in Missouri to promote paid paternity leave. 

Father seeks justice in child custody case

85272187_S.jpgMost Missouri parents realize that raising children can be both rewarding and stressful. When two parents maintain separate households, it is not unusual for litigation over child custody to occur. When a court enters a child custody order, it cannot be violated just because a parent does not agree with the arrangement set forth by the court. 

Years ago, a Missouri father was granted custody of his infant daughter. The child went missing shortly after, and the father spent years in turmoil, hoping for the safe return of his daughter. Police in another state stumbled upon the child's mother and were shocked to discover the missing child was by her side. 

Legislators propose changes to family law

60917037_S.jpgMany Missouri families might be excited to learn about some changes on the horizon. Adoption is a legal process and falls under the category of family law. Families want to adopt for a myriad of reasons, and children in need of a loving family may have to wait a long time for that dream to become reality. 

Adoption is currently a rather expensive endeavor. Some lawmakers are hoping to change that. They have proposed changes to make adoption a less expensive process so that more children can find loving families. 

Grandmother seeks child custody amid mysterious case

12343444_S.jpgMissouri residents may have seen a recent news story regarding a missing person. A local woman has seemingly disappeared, and neither family or authorities have been able to determine her whereabouts. The woman is a mother of five, and now, her own mother must take action regarding child custody

The woman is being treated as a missing person, and it is not yet known if she has gone somewhere of her own free will, or if she is the victim of a crime. As authorities race to locate her, the woman's mother has grown concerned about the five young children. The last time anyone saw the missing woman, she was dropping her children off at school. 

Child support cases may see shakeup in legal process

46651305_S.jpgWith the end of the school year fast approaching, Missouri parents are making plans to keep their little ones entertained during the summer months. For those who are divorced, paying for activities such as summer camps and vacation can be a challenge for the custodial parent. One way to help meet this need is for the non-custodial parent to make timely and accurate child support payments

Currently, if a parent falls behind on payments, he or she can face consequences in criminal court. Fines, a loss of driving privileges and jail time are some of the ways a court can punish a parent for non-payment. Many parents are asking the state of Missouri to change the way delinquent child support cases are handled. This is because some of these consequences, especially losing a driver's license, only makes them fall further behind, causing a child to go without even longer. 

Child support payments can provide much-needed help for kids

64575667_S.jpgMissouri parents are working hard. Recent statistics illustrate that the rate of child poverty across the state is on the decline. Still, many families struggle to make ends meet, and a parent may have resources, like filing for child support, that he or she has not explored. 

It is estimated that one in five Missouri children still live in homes that qualify as below the poverty level. Some parents express frustration because they may not be able to cover the financial costs of all the things a child needs to learn and grow. Utilities, food, shelter and other everyday expenses can pile up quickly. 

New bill could shake up child custody standards

46594751_S.jpgMissouri is trying to ensure that progress continues to be made when it comes to families that reside within the state. A new bill, which supporters hope will soon be made a law, revolves around how courts handle child custody. Currently, it is not against the norm for one parent to have more custody than the other, but many parents insist such policy is unfair. 

Under the new bill, 50/50 custody would become the norm, unless the court is made aware of a legitimate reason that a child would be better off spending most of his or her time with one parent. A judge will now have a list of criteria to consider. If each parent can meet a child's needs, 50/50 custody will become the status quo. 

Contact Our Team To Get Help Now

Tell us about your case and we’ll get back to you promptly.

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Stange Logo

Stange Law Firm, PC
2268 Bluestone Drive
St. Charles, Missouri 63303

Toll Free: 855-805-0595
Fax: 314-963-9191
St. Louis Law Office Map

DHQ | Divorce Headquarters Divorce
Headquarters ® App Download The App
Questions? Live Chat Pay Your Bill Online
States of Service

Other Office Locations

  • Saint Louis County: 120 S. Central Ave., Suite 450, Clayton, MO 63105: Clayton Office
  • West County: 16024 Manchester Rd., Suite 103, Ellisville, MO 63011: Ellisville Office
  • Jackson County: 256 NE Tudor Rd., Lee's Summit, Missouri 64086: Lee's Summit Office
  • Jefferson County: 16 Municipal Drive, Suite C, Arnold, MO 63010: Arnold Office
  • St. Charles County: 2268 Bluestone Drive, St. Charles, MO 63303: St. Charles Office
  • Franklin County: 5 S. Oak St. Union, MO 63084: Union Office
  • Lincoln County: 20 Centerline Drive, Troy, Missouri 63379: Troy Office
  • Boone County: 1506 Chapel Hill Rd., Suite H, Columbia, MO 65203: Columbia Office
  • Greene County: 901 E. St. Louis, Suite 404, Springfield, Missouri 65806 Springfield, MO Office
  • St. Clair County: 115 Lincoln Place Ct., Ste. 101, Belleville, IL 62221: Belleville Office
  • Madison County: 5 Club Centre Ct., Suite A, Edwardsville, Illinois 62025: Edwardsville Office
  • Sangamon County: 400 S. 9th St., Suite 100, Springfield, IL 62701: Springfield Office
  • McLean County: 1012 Ekstam Drive, Suite 4, Bloomington, IL 61704: Bloomington Office
  • Johnson County: 7300 West 110th Street, Suite 560, Overland Park, KS 62210: Overland Park Office
  • Sedgwick County: 2024 N. Woodlawn Street, Suite 407, Wichita, Kansas 67208: Wichita Office
  • Shawnee County: 800 SW Jackson Street, Suite 812, Topeka, Kansas 66612: Topeka Office
  • Tulsa County: 6660 S. Sheridan Road, Suite 240, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 Tulsa Office
  • Monroe County: 116 W. Mill St., Waterloo, IL 62298 (by appt. only): Waterloo Office
  • St. Louis City: 100 S. 4th St., #549, St. Louis, MO 63102 (by appt. only): St. Louis Office
  • Jackson County: 2300 Main St., #948, Kansas City, MO 64108 (by appt. only): Kansas City Office

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision & should not be based solely upon advertisements. See additional disclaimers here.