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High Asset Divorce Archives

The importance of a QDRO during equitable division

65396714_S.jpgWhether worth tens of thousands of dollars or significantly less, retirement savings are incredibly valuable to most people. Even relatively small accounts can provide a solid foundation for financial peace during retirement. Many divorcees in Missouri are understandably worried about how their retirement savings will be handled during equitable division.

Complex property division has financial implications in divorce

41127521_S.jpgEnding a marriage can be stressful, most couples in Missouri would understandably like to push through the process as quickly as possible. However, rushing a divorce is rarely a good idea, particularly for those who have significant marital assets. Complex property division, spousal support and additional expenses can all have a profound financial impact and should be considered carefully.

Complex property division can be stressful later in life

44699825_S.jpgThe emotional cost of remaining in an unhappy marriage often outweighs the potential financial stress created by divorce. While everyone in Missouri should be cautious of their finances during divorce, this is especially true for those going through so-called gray divorces. Divorcing later in life often results in complex property division involving significant financial investments, including homes and retirement savings.

Equitable division of retirement assets in divorce

39457958_S.jpgMany Missouri couples spend years building their retirement savings and planning for their golden years. The typical couple generally assumes that they will spend these years enjoying each other's company and perhaps even traveling to new places. However, when reality takes over and the couple realizes that there are no joint golden years to come, difficult decisions must be made. Often, these decisions include the equitable division of property in an upcoming divorce settlement.

Some people try to take equitable division into their own hands

In all matters of divorce in Missouri and throughout the nation, the court has the final say regarding any type of settlement, agreement, child custody, visitation or property division issue. In some situations, that's no big deal, and spouses merely formulate their agreed upon plans ahead of time, then seek the court's approval. Other times, however (espe32496022_S.jpgcially when it comes to the equitable division process), problems arise that prompt concerned spouses to seek outside support.

Seniors prone to high asset divorce problems

39457958_S.jpgGray divorce is on the rise in Missouri and other states. It has nothing to do with hair color or the sky. It does, however, have to do with how old a person is when he or she files for divorce. The term has been applied to those severing marital ties after age 50. In a high asset divorce, this can present significant challenges because the later in life divorce is filed, the more financial issues and property division problems there tends to be.

Why protecting business interests shouldn't involve hidden assets

50833034_S.jpgWhen divorce occurs in Missouri or any other state, spouses may face obstacles regarding asset division in court. Especially in a high net worth situation (for instance, if a successful business is owned by both spouses) emotions may be highly charged regarding who gets what and what will happen to the business. Sometimes, it's determined that selling a business is the fairest way to handle such circumstances. If one spouse plans to try to maintain control of a business, however, it's best to avoid hidden assets or other questionable means for protecting one's interests.

Not every mother-in-law has a say in a high asset divorce

56472638_S.jpgBeing a member of the Royal Family in England is celebrity status at its highest level. Nearly two decades after Princess Diana's tragic death, gossip columnists continue to speculate whether the fatal motor vehicle accident in which she was involved was truly an accident or result of foul play. The princess and her former husband, Charles, had recently secured a high asset divorce, which was headline news at the time. Even though most Missouri residents live far simpler lives, when it comes to divorce and marital property issues, many may relate to the former Princess of Wales' situation.

Addressing financial concerns in high net worth divorce

53905695_S.jpgNot all Missouri couples who divorce have set financial plans for their individual futures. Often, unresolved issues must first be negotiated and final court decisions handed down before a concrete path toward the future can be envisioned. In the meantime, various aspects of a high net worth divorce may be cause for financial concern.

Financial prep and marital assets review crucial in divorce

35137027_S.jpgUnlike some other states in the nation, Missouri is known as an equitable property state, which means property and assets may not necessarily be divided evenly during divorce. In community property states, assets and income earned during the marriage are considered owned equally by the parties. In Missouri, and other equitable distribution states, marital assets are distributed fairly, although perhaps not equally.

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  • Saint Louis County: 120 S. Central Ave., Suite 450, Clayton, MO 63105: Clayton Office
  • West County: 16024 Manchester Rd., Suite 103, Ellisville, MO 63011: Ellisville Office
  • Jackson County: 256 NE Tudor Rd., Lee's Summit, Missouri 64086: Lee's Summit Office
  • Jefferson County: 16 Municipal Drive, Suite C, Arnold, MO 63010: Arnold Office
  • St. Charles County: 2268 Bluestone Drive, St. Charles, MO 63303: St. Charles Office
  • Franklin County: 5 S. Oak St. Union, MO 63084: Union Office
  • Lincoln County: 20 Centerline Drive, Troy, Missouri 63379: Troy Office
  • Boone County: 1506 Chapel Hill Rd., Suite H, Columbia, MO 65203: Columbia Office
  • Greene County: 901 E. St. Louis, Suite 404, Springfield, Missouri 65806 Springfield, MO Office
  • St. Clair County: 115 Lincoln Place Ct., Ste. 101, Belleville, IL 62221: Belleville Office
  • Madison County: 5 Club Centre Ct., Suite A, Edwardsville, Illinois 62025: Edwardsville Office
  • Sangamon County: 400 S. 9th St., Suite 100, Springfield, IL 62701: Springfield Office
  • McLean County: 1012 Ekstam Drive, Suite 4, Bloomington, IL 61704: Bloomington Office
  • Johnson County: 7300 West 110th Street, Suite 560, Overland Park, KS 62210: Overland Park Office
  • Sedgwick County: 2024 N. Woodlawn Street, Suite 407, Wichita, Kansas 67208: Wichita Office
  • Shawnee County: 800 SW Jackson Street, Suite 812, Topeka, Kansas 66612: Topeka Office
  • Tulsa County: 6660 S. Sheridan Road, Suite 240, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 Tulsa Office
  • Monroe County: 116 W. Mill St., Waterloo, IL 62298 (by appt. only): Waterloo Office
  • St. Louis City: 100 S. 4th St., #549, St. Louis, MO 63102 (by appt. only): St. Louis Office
  • Jackson County: 2300 Main St., #948, Kansas City, MO 64108 (by appt. only): Kansas City Office

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